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August 10, 2011

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I found the analysis of former FBI and DEA agents in this article very interesting:

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2011/07/us-court-documents-claim-sinaloa-cartel.html#more

Basically, there are numerous scenarios that could have played out. I think that we don't know the full story just yet.

Sylvia,

There has been a lot of talk about the Mexican government going after certain cartels only, or "the smaller cartels" or about not fighting all cartels in the same way or simply that the Mexican government cut a deal with Chapo.

It is true that the Mexican Federal forces have arrested many leaders of La Familia, los Zetas and other cartels that are supposed to be rivals of la federacion.

But what escapes many analysts is that these are different cartels and that they are more easily captured or eliminated precisely because they act and move differently than the Sinaloa Cartel, Chapo´s organization.

Zetas, La Familia and other cartels are kidnapping, extorting, counterfeiting legal documents, dealing and smuggling piracy and illegal products, etc. in short, they have a lot more exposure than Sinaloa Cartel and other cartels that are mostly selling drugs and operate at more low-profile levels.

The violence and terror generated by thousands of kidnappings in many cities, the extortion practiced, the piracy and many other criminal activities common to zetas, la familia, la linea and others also generates a lot of calls for help from the communities, thousands of people calling the federal forces telephone numbers providing information leading to important arrests of those criminals.

Also, the pressure these cartels put on society makes it a priority for the federal government to finish them faster. The zetas and la familia create civilian unrest, disrupt economic, social life in cities.

In sum, nobody likes those people at all, they are making absolutely no friends.

When I was a kid, we all knew there were some narcos in our communities. They were particularly notorious in small communities for their contributions to the local festivities, they had brand new ford trucks, but they would buy them at the local dealerships, they had huge homes, but they will pay local construction workers well for building them, their wifes and women wore jewelry, but they were clients of important high-end jewelry shops and their kids went to important universities both at home and abroad.

I am not advocating them at all, their money came from selling drugs and it was not right, but they were and are a completely different crime model from what the zetas and la familia are today, these cartels are completely destructive, they have created a spiral of violence were they are the first ones to be destroyed but also they get a lot of people killed in the process. They are irrational, there is no sense or logic in what they do.

I think, if the Mexican forces are catching more of those criminals than the others, it is happening for obvious reasons.

They definitely shouldn't let the drug flow happen for that long! Hopefully the story is untrue. I imagine so.

Sylvia, thanks for taking time to cover this aspect of the problem of this war. Follow up:

Court Pleadings Point to CIA Role in Alleged “Cartel” Immunity Deal
Posted by Bill Conroy - September 11, 2011 at 12:22 pm

Mexican Narco-Trafficker’s Revelations in Criminal Case Force US Government to Invoke National Security Claims.
US government prosecutors filed pleadings in the case late last week seeking to invoke the Classified Information Procedures Act (CIPA), a measure designed to assure national security information does not surface in public court proceedings.
“That is a very reasonable conclusion [that the CIA is likely involved in this case in some way],” says a former federal agent familiar with national security procedures. “Seeking CIPA protection, yup, there is hot stuff to hide.”
The US mainstream media echoed loudly the US government’s denial of any law-enforcement immunity deal existing with Zambada Niebla via a barrage of reports published in recent days, but those same reports are completely silent on the CIPA pleadings that were lodged with the court at the same time as the government’s denials.
A key player central to the informant pact struck between the US government and the Sinaloa organization’s leadership, according to Zambada Niebla’s court filings, is a Mexican lawyer named Humberto Loya Castro, who is described in US legal documents as “a close confidante of Joaquin Guzman Loera (Chapo),” the supposed leader of the Sinaloa organization. Loya Castro acted as the intermediary representing the Sinaloa organization in its quid pro quo arrangement with the US government, Zambada Niebla’s court pleadings allege.

Really? I know I know nothing but what I read but, what a wicked web we weave. Hard working people cut down at the knees, for what? Politik kills. Everyone knows ... the good guys lost...

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