My Photo
I am a consultant and analyst with eight years of military law enforcement experience, six years of analytical experience covering Latin America, and over seven years of analytical experience covering Mexican TCOs and border violence issues. This blog is designed to inform readers about current border violence issues and provide analysis on those issues, as well as detailed focus on specific border topics. By applying my knowledge and experience through this blog, I hope to separate the wheat from the chaff...that is, dispel rumors propagated by sensationalist media reporting, explain in layman's terms what is going on with Mexican TCOs, and most importantly, WHY violence is happening along the US-Mexico border.

Longmire_square

With over a dozen years of combined experience in military law enforcement, force protection analysis, and writing a variety of professional products for the US Air Force, state government in California, and the general public, Ms. Longmire has the expertise to create a superior product for you or your agency to further your understanding of Mexico’s drug war. Longmire Consulting is dedicated to being on the cusp of the latest developments in Mexico in order to bring you the best possible analysis of threats posed by the drug violence south of the border.

Follow DrugWarAnalyst on Twitter

« Conflicting accounts about Heriberto "El Lazca" Lazcano's death | Main | Interview on MSNBC with Jose Diaz-Balart »

June 18, 2011

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Well done! As a layman, I agree that narcos will not be easily put away by denying some or all of one of their product lines.

Once we legalize kidnapping, extortion and prostitution the cartels (DTOs, TCOs) won't stand a chance!

Maybe the legalization of various drugs isn't gonna stop the cartels in a longterm perspective.
But as you say it has alot of other benefits and I believe it still would be an important first step in the fight towards organized crime. And besides if you could stop 60% of their income in short period of time it would take a long time for them to adapt to this new market.

I really dont see how a legalization could cause any harm. But I do think it's important that you inform people of that a legalization is just an answere to organized crime rather than a solution.
But as they say, only time will tell... I hope.

"And besides if you could stop 60% of their income in short period of time it would take a long time for them to adapt to this new market."
You are a little naive about the cartels. They will adapt very quickly and if they get deparate they will just steal more gas/oil and cause more violence.

The US Mafia did not end when prohibition ended. They just returned to loan sharking/prostitution and entered into the drug trade. The mafia was only hurt when arrests were made and long senteces imposed during the 60's and 70's.

Enforcing the law and justice, not running away is the only the only thing to do.

I would not be surprised to find out that the Mexican cartels are actually funneling $$ into the USA to support anti-legalization efforts on drugs. Drug legalization (e.g. marijuana) could potentially eat their profits ... so the irony is that the cartels may be fighting legalization by supporting right wing political organizations.

P.

"I would not be surprised to find out that the Mexican cartels are actually funneling $$ into the USA to support anti-legalization efforts on drugs"

I would think they would support the opposite. There would be a lot less attention to smuggling contraband to just avoid taxes. I would think they are overjoyed at the medical marijuana dispensaries in Arizona. Perfect opportunity to co-opt a legal enterprise to continue their illegal operations.

Nice ideologically driven arguement though.

@Hero

+1

I think this article reaffirms the argument that Mexico doesn't just have a problem with drug trafficking and American demand for drugs, thay have an entrenched organized crime problem that is beginning to threaten their nation.

Many of their law enforcement, judicial and penal institutions are ineffective and corrupt because Mexico does not have a strong rule of law in their government or their culture.

Jorge Castaneda, former Foreign Minister of Mexico, wrote in an LA Times OP-ED 6/17/2011 " The rule of law does not really exist in Mexico today, in big and small matters alike" and that Mexicans must establish a "rule of law that guarantees its citizens security..."

"Jorge Castaneda, former Foreign Minister of Mexico, wrote in an LA Times OP-ED 6/17/2011 " The rule of law does not really exist in Mexico today, in big and small matters alike" and that Mexicans must establish a "rule of law that guarantees its citizens security...""

The misunderstanding in this statement demonstrates the root cause of Mexico's ills. Mexico is not a haven for criminal activity because the government cannot guarantee it's people's security, it is because the people don't realize that it is NOT the government's job to guarantee their security. Every individual has a duty to protect themselves and their families. When they transfer that duty to the government they lose the right to defend themselves and to own the means for that defense.

Mexico has become a country of people rather than a country of laws. They do not have equal justice but justice based on who a person is. This is called social justice or liberation theology here in the US and has its roots in Marxism and other identity politics movements but I think there is a deeper connection to the plantation colonial days or even the native cultures of Mexico.

Mexicans, and most Latin Americans, need to realize that their duties and associated rights come from God not from government and begin to fight those who ignore those rights. If they abdicate their duties and rights to government they should not be surprised with what they get.

In fact, arrests for marijuana possession disproportionately affect blacks and Hispanics and reinforce the perception that law enforcement is biased and prejudiced against minorities.

The comments to this entry are closed.