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I am a consultant and analyst with eight years of military law enforcement experience, six years of analytical experience covering Latin America, and over seven years of analytical experience covering Mexican TCOs and border violence issues. This blog is designed to inform readers about current border violence issues and provide analysis on those issues, as well as detailed focus on specific border topics. By applying my knowledge and experience through this blog, I hope to separate the wheat from the chaff...that is, dispel rumors propagated by sensationalist media reporting, explain in layman's terms what is going on with Mexican TCOs, and most importantly, WHY violence is happening along the US-Mexico border.

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With over a dozen years of combined experience in military law enforcement, force protection analysis, and writing a variety of professional products for the US Air Force, state government in California, and the general public, Ms. Longmire has the expertise to create a superior product for you or your agency to further your understanding of Mexico’s drug war. Longmire Consulting is dedicated to being on the cusp of the latest developments in Mexico in order to bring you the best possible analysis of threats posed by the drug violence south of the border.

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June 23, 2011

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I'm simply astounded by the analysis contained within these articles. Further Amazed that if is on a small blog style page and not in the from pages of American Newspapers, and at the intro's to Nightly news-corp broadcasts.

I believe the Drug epidemic and death toll will only cease until we follow science over our urge for violence. There has been amazing strides made in the medicine of abuse, and even somewhat of a cure of opiate use (see Subutex). However, healthcare remains a privilege of the few and the wealthy, not the masses. If only the wealthy knew that those addicted simply burglarized, murdered, robbed, carjacked, etc. to get their drugs anyways (despite the taxes paid to law enforcement, police, incarceration, and the military). It would perhaps make the cost of healthcare seem worth it in another view?

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